A doctor holding red stethoscope.

Understanding Unspecified Depression Type Diagnosis

The last seven years of my medical history have been confusing. When I looked over my medical summaries, I noticed I was diagnosed with depression, in some way, shape, or form for these years. I guess since I declined to take prescription medicines for my depression, the doctor(s) may have just decided to not look further into my issues. Maybe they just thought I was resistant, or crazy.

Lately, I’ve been getting stressed at work. In most cases, I think I can manage, but sometimes things are beyond my control. For instance, there are times we are required to work overtime- 12 days straight. Also, the expectations of my company keep changing. More is demanded at times, at other times, I feel bored, unchallenged and unappreciated.

In any event, I knew my previous medical practice wasn’t good for me. I felt like I needed a doctor with good reviews. I researched the doctors in my insurance directory and discovered one in town that was a D.O., instead of an M.D. The difference is an M.D. is a Doctor of Medicine, while a D.O. is a Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine. From my understanding, there is very little difference as far as certification and training:

“While osteopathic programs tend to be less competitive than allopathic medical schools, students in both programs receive similar training. However, osteopathic schools have a stronger focus on alternative therapies, holistic medicine, and disease prevention.” (www.gulfbend.org)

  • This factor appealed to me since I am one that has been resistant to taking prescription medications.
  • I went to the new doctor for convenience (he is located in town, as opposed to my previous doctor, who was about 12 miles from my home).

I went to establish a new doctor, but I discovered I have ectopic heartbeats, or, extra heartbeats. Soon, I will have to wear a Holter monitor to find out more information.

Also, my diagnosis included:

  • Anxiety
  • Depression, unspecified depression type
  • Fatigue, unspecified type.

Depression, unspecified depression type is often used at the beginning of medical diagnosis and treatment. This category is used when there is not yet enough information. Once the doctor has my information, he or she may proceed to choose a more specific condition.

As far as the other conditions are concerned, I suppose I could worry. I’ve read that PVC’s- Premature Ventricular Contractions, can be induced by anxiety. Sometimes the PVCs are nothing to worry about if all else is normal. It could also be a sign of underlying heart disease.

My new doctor asked me if I felt any fluttering in my chest, to which I replied that I hadn’t noticed. I’ve been so consumed about mood disorders, I took for granted the fact that just because I have had a long history of anxiety and depression, doesn’t mean that I can’t have other problems. I’ve been accustomed to “invisible” problems for so long that I ignored my “visible” problems.

Such is the case for me. I become blinded by my own thought patterns. I really wanted my doctor to look into this aspect of my health too.

References:

  1.  https://medschool.ucla.edu/body.cfm?id=1158&action=detail&ref=1019
  2. https://www.nchmd.org/education/mayo-health-library/details/CON-20376741
  3. https://www.gulfbend.org/poc/view_doc.php?type=doc&id=12992&cn=5